Coach Agent Gil Scott on How to Prepare for Your Next Job

Aaron Wilbur

I’m a husband, father, sports nut, entrepreneur and grateful to call Vancouver home. I enjoy cooking, watching live music and hiking the North Shore mountains with my family. My son is a football player, which has turned me into a big football fan. It’s helped me appreciate what hockey parents go through, especially those who have little experience with the sport, when trying to navigate their child up the hockey ladder.

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There's no instruction manual when it comes to finding your next coaching job or how to prepare for an interview, but it’s a skill that all successful coaches need.
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For episode #174 of the Glass and Out podcast, we revisit one of our favourite conversations from last year’s Virtual Hockey Summit. As many hockey seasons begin to wrap up, the time for coaches to start looking and networking for their next jobs is upon us.

Gil Scott is the President & CEO of Gil Scott Sports Management and is the agent for top NHL coaches like Barry Trotz and Bruce Boudreau. He spoke with TCS Founder Aaron Wilbur on what it takes to prepare for an interview and be at your best when there’s a lot on the line.

Scott founded Gil Scott Sports Management in 1979 and has negotiated over 500 contracts of coaches and players. In addition to his clientele of coaches, he currently represents 65 active NFL and CFL players. He is a graduate of Michigan State University, was the first Canadian to be certified by the NFLPA and served as a sports consultant for the Royal Banks Sports Professionals Program from 1997-2009.

There is no instruction manual when it comes to finding your next coaching job or how to prepare for an interview, but it’s a skill that all successful coaches need. And while having the right strategy heading into an interview or being comfortable approaching people in the industry with the goal of opening a door to your next gig may not make you a better coach than other candidates, it very well could mean you still get the nod.

Hear valuable advice on what approach is best to take heading into the interview process, what he’s learned from working with some of the top coaches in hockey, and why networking is still a coaches best friend when it comes to finding new opportunities.

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