How to deal with hockey players who don’t “battle” and “compete”

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The uncoachables. The damn players who won’t “battle” and “compete.” The ones that you see doing skillful stuff in practice. They’re on their Instagram and on their Snapchat…but who just WON’T increase their intensity and battle in a game. Ugh!

You’ve talked to them, you threatened them, you moved them down to the fourth line, you sat them on the bench. Nothing changes…

You can probably feel the frustration, even right now, as you think about this player who just won’t respond to your commands for “battle” and “compete.” What the hell do you do with that player? Your only choice is to bench them, right?

Maybe not.

What if there was a way to solve this problem? What if you stood on the bench and watched a previously low-intensity player charge through the gate and into their shift with confidence and right into a battle situation? How would it feel to watch that player winning battles and competing with the intensity of a wolverine on bath salts? Wouldn’t that feel fantastic? Wouldn’t that be best for you, for the team, and for that individual player? Wouldn’t the parents be excited to see their kid being used in a game again because they were battling? 

There's a better way to get your message through . . .

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JasonYee

Hi, I'm Jason Yee. I'm a professional hockey player, kinesiologist, and the founder of Train 2.0. My goal is to make instructions for hockey players simple, trustworthy, and measurable by leveraging science, technology, and psychology. My method is to research NHLers through video, instruct others and myself, then gather feedback to refine my knowledge. I love documenting the journey publicly and online. I'd love to hear from you and let me know what you think - Your feedback is my oxygen. Thanks for reading my article today. Hit me up on email: [email protected] or follow my Instagram account: @train2point0

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