Hockey Dryland Training Coach

Hockey Dryland Training for Coaches

In Leadership by The Coaches Site

Written By: Dan Garner -Head Strength Coach at HockeyTraining.com

In this article I am going to go over an approach coaches can use with their team at the rink before or after a practice to enhance both the speed and conditioning of their athletes in a different and more effective way.

Now to enhance both speed and conditioning for hockey players requires a very well thought out periodized strength and conditioning system. But, not all coaches have the luxury of a private gym for their athletes, a strength coach designated for their team or even athletes who are committed enough to train on their own time outside of when they’re on the ice.

Which is why I am putting this article together for the coaches that want to enhance the strength and conditioning of their athletes specifically for the game of hockey and want to be able to do it with the whole team either before or after a practice.

To increase their speed and conditioning on the ice hockey players should be incorporating a dryland training system that challenges the muscular recruitment, motor patterns, energy systems and intensities utilized the most during the game of hockey.

This means, for hockey players, speed and conditioning are highly alactic and anaerobic in nature. The game of hockey is far more anaerobic performance based then it is aerobic based so to improve your performance on the ice you have to train the energy systems utilized during the game.    

This means zero low-intensity, long duration runs for your athletes. Jogging at a low to moderate pace for long durations is not going to have maximal carryover into the game of hockey. Those who know their sport performance physiology well know that residual adaptations from aerobic development last up to 30 days.

So once a hockey player has built up a base aerobic capacity, he only needs to revisit it every so often to maintain that. Once it has been built and even throughout the process a hockey player should be working on his anaerobic conditioning and his maximal power output throughout the year. These are the things that are going to make him not only faster on the ice, but also the things that are going to make him feel much fresher in the 3rd period.

Do you ever notice when hockey players go for long jogs and yet they are still exhausted in the 3rd period? That’s because they are training the wrong energy systems responsible for performance in their sport. Also a potential nutritional mistake during game day nutrition, but that’s a different conversation.

I have discussed the physiology behind hockey conditioning at lengths online and also why it is very important from a structural balance standpoint for them also to specifically be sprinting in the offseason so I won’t dive into it all here.

Something that you can do with your team that would benefit them greatly and have maximal carryover to the game of hockey would be to get the team together and either perform a sprint workout or a conditioning session more based around variety.

I will provide you two sample workouts that would be perfect for any hockey team to incorporate off the ice together. Ideally, these would be performed after the practice due to the skill requirement and fresh legs/mind needed for sport improvement.

Additionally, these should never be performed before or after a game. Before the game would have them too gassed out to perform properly on the ice and after the game they are also too gassed out to perform the workout properly and lazy movement mechanics during sprinting increases the susceptibility to injury.

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SAMPLE TEAM SPRINT WORKOUT

WARM UP

Overhead squats x 10

Overhead reverse lunge x 10 per leg

Overhead side lunge x 10 per side

A-skips x 20 yards (3 sets)

On all fours, donkey kicks x 10 per leg

On all fours, single leg hip circles x 10 per leg

B-skips x 20 yards (3 sets)

Side shuffles x 10 yards there and back

Standing hip circles x 10

Slow to fast build up sprints x 2, 20yd sprints

SPRINT WORKOUT

8 x 30 yards with 240 seconds rest in between sprints

4 x 3 consecutive broad jumps with maximum effort and a pause at each landing. 120 secs in between sets.

SAMPLE TEAM HOCKEY CONDITIONING WORKOUT

WARM UP

Overhead squats x 10

Overhead reverse lunge x 10 per leg

Overhead side lunge x 10 per side

A-skips x 20 yards (3 sets)

On all fours, donkey kicks x 10 per leg

On all fours, single leg hip circles x 10 per leg

B-skips x 20 yards (3 sets)

Side shuffles x 10 yards there and back

Standing hip circles x 10

Slow to fast build up sprints x 2, 20yd sprints

CONDITIONING WORKOUT

Box jumps: 10 sets of 3 jumps / 30 secs between sets

Sprints: 10 x 20 yards / 30 secs between sprints

Backwards, overhead med ball throws*: 10 x 3 throws / 30 secs between sets

*Ideally you should begin with a medicine ball 10% of your body weight

Those are basic examples of proper hockey dryland training workouts although those exercises aren’t set in stone, the replacements are endless with the amount of variations you can do. Overtime it’s important to increase your teams work capacity and conditioning, you would simply either increase the amount of work done within those parameters or decrease your rest periods.

Head on over to HockeyTraining.com to check out our full Off Season Hockey Training Program that you can recommend to your hockey team!


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The Coaches Site

The Coaches Site an online resource for hockey coaches and hosts of the TeamSnap Hockey Coaches Conference.

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